Posts Tagged ‘ebooks announcement’

“The Boy in the Sandwich” ready to be eaten via Kindle

Tuesday, June 28th, 2011



The Boy in the Sandwich is out in paperback, and now…


It is out and available on Kindle in the USA, the UK and Europe.


Professional formatting with the original illustrations, you can find links to buy it by clicking on this highlighted bit.


Thanks for reading, and enjoy this simple, cozy, semi-weird tale. — Vincent

My two published novels from 2009 are now available on Kindle

Thursday, July 29th, 2010




It’s taken a while but I have my two books up and running as Kindle eboooks, via Amazon, of course.


You can find the “link to Self-Portrait of Someone Else” here.



You can find the link “How to Find Yourself (or a reasonable facsimile)” here.



Pricing is $2.99 from Amazon.com.
(Should insert “What a deal!” and other exclamation marks here.)


Purchasing these outside the USA will be higher than my stated price, as Amazon adds some suspect transfer fees, and as we know, it’s oh so much more expensive to download files in the USA compared to, say, Canada or Belgium. There’s little I can do about it currently, because at this point, it’s Amazon’s way or the highway. It will no doubt remain this way until Amazon, slowly but surely, gets its act together as Kindle distribution centers are established in the rest of world. *see below


Note: my base price stays of $2.99 is the same, no matter what you are charged.


Anyway, if you have a Kindle, you can get my books and have a happier summer, a more expansive life and all in all general all-purpose beatific experiences….


Thanks for reading.


* (Update Aug.6, 2010) I believe I was wrong when I first posted this. I just ran into this:
“…in most EU countries, taxes on e-books are double the taxes on p-books, thanks to a rather bizarre ruling of the European Commission, which decided that the supply of a “book on any physical support comes under supply of goods, whereas the downloading of an e-book is defined as a supply of services. Therefore different VAT rates apply.” This quite clearly means that according to EU bureaucrats, taxation on books should be lower, because they are printed on paper or stored on a DVD, and not because the book is a repository of culture and knowledge. Or to go one step further in this line of reasoning, for European bureaucrats the novels read on paper are culture, but the ones read on Kindle are not. I’m sure Marshall McLuhan would love this way of reasoning as it shows that European bureaucrats are true believers of his dictum that “the medium is the message”. However, in the context of the e-book trade, this puts European e-booksellers in a more difficult position than their American counterparts as they are burdened with higher taxes. “
Link to this article.