The woman who dropped things (story)

June 23rd, 2015

GlassSwirls



It began to end for her with an empty glass. Just taking it out of the dish washing machine, all warm and sparkling and clean and sleek feeling—so sleek it slipped. As though her fingers had momentarily forgotten the concept of to hold. As though the sleekness was too overwhelming. As though something she couldn’t quite put her finger, or fingers, on occurred.


The glass did not float or acrobatically tumble. It rocketed straight down and exploded on the tiles of the kitchen floor scattering glass particles every which way. Fragments shot passed her feet, rolled toward the dishwasher, under the refrigerator, bits bounced up against the nearest wall, a major glittering mess from such a insignificant mishap.


Next her bottle of pills slipped. Medicine spilled everywhere. She would find hidden oval-shaped pills for days to come in the most unexpected places, usually where dust gathered. She tried to put her arm in one sleeve of a favorite blouse but missed and let go, thinking her arm was in there, and the blouse ballooned and floated, as the glass had not, to the ground, a brief odd-shaped parachute. She leaned over with a grunt to pick up the blouse and she dropped the two earrings she had been holding in her other hand. She watched both land, each one beside her feet, one left, one right.


Recently her husband had fallen out of love with her and dropped her for someone he himself had fallen for, her daughter had dropped out of university and was dropping out generally, and by the end of the week the family cat had dropped dead. Her eye-drops had gone missing. The bottom had fallen out of the stock market. There was a drop-off in the outside temperature. Flies were dropping … like flies.


At the one local bookstore that still existed she went to pick up a book on dropping things. She had been told such books were located in the Self-Help section, which she didn’t like the sound of. Yet there she found several books addressing the subject, however the prose of the first pages of each one came off as too cheery, too supportive and encouraging and so positive sounding she resisted. The book told lots of stories from all sorts of different people who dropped things and how they cured, or coped, with this minor adversity. The book was targeted at a general readership of those people who were loosing their grip.


While reading a further five books on dropping things she dropped a scissors that pegged her thigh briefly. Her glasses broke into two pieces and she’d taped them back together, and the neighbor’s tiny dog fell from the nest of her usually secure arms and the doggie never quite trusted her again. Five ink pens at five different times of the day dropped from her fingers, the last three of which she just left lying there on the ground, and she also dropped her guard and bought something over the Internet and she dropped her latest suiter, or would have, if she had had one, but that was just part of her general feeling of ineptitude going a bit too far.


It was when her little finger on her left hand dropped off that she thought that maybe, really, there was something not right to all this. She reached down to pick up her little finger — unlike the cap to the bottle of ketchup, her knitting needles, an electricity bill, a banana peel and some objects she couldn’t quite quantify and finally had just left laying about — yet just as she gripped her fallen little finger, the two fingers gripping the fallen little finger fell, and now she was, at last, deeply alarmed. She got down on her knees to study the situation closer and her right kneecap flopped off. Using her lips, she tried to scoop up one of the three fingers laying on the floor — no longer trusting her fingers to stay put where they belonged — but just as she retrieved one finger in her mouth, her lower lip dropped off.


When her head suddenly wobbled, then went points south and just plain bounced and rolled to a spot near the bedroom door, she let it stay there. Right next to one of those pens. The way her life was going, she figured she wasn’t going to need her head.


Five weeks later lazy neighbors thought something slightly sinister might have occurred inside the eerily quiet house on the street. One called emergency services. Someone from social services dropped by on their way home and knocked on the door, rang the bell, put his face next to a front window, clapping his hands around his face to see in but couldn’t see anyone. He called a real emergency number the following day.


People who dealt with emergencies arrived and forced open the front door. Subsequent television news reports called the discovery inside “The Woman Who Fell Apart”.


“Bits and pieces of a longtime city resident, a female, were found in different areas of the house. Sources close to the investigation stated that fallen objects ranged from loose eyeballs to whole toe nails. Foul play has not been ruled out. There are currently no leads,” reported the television news reader. Within twenty-four hours, this local news event failed to pick up national coverage, so the news item on the woman who dropped things was dropped.



Storyteller – my story of my storytelling

April 29th, 2015

After a year’s quiet, a new video, a story about my storytelling….





VE

A couple of doors down – video/story

April 8th, 2014

Body next door

Hello.


It’s been a long while since I did a blog post. I have been writing, completing work that I started decades ago. I take breaks, make a video, work on my audio books. A while back I was regularly publishing very short fiction I called Noises in the House. Did a few videos on some, and I have made another.


Titled, A few doors down, you can view it at any one of these three sites where I loaded it up:


YouTube


Vimeo


DailyMotion


The original story can be read by clicking right here.


It’s about someone who died in his house and nobody missed him until the smell….


Have a look or read, as time or interest dictate. – Vincent

“Shoulder” – story published online from Vincent Eaton’s story collection “Intimate Dialogues”

October 1st, 2013

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Mr. Eaton has asked me to inform you that this is (probably) the last of his semi-badgering promotional activities based around the publication of his story collection Intimate Dialogues.


Four stories from this collection had been published previously online by different magazines. At least three of these, I’ve been informed, have been shouted at you (in a very online sort of way) during these last summer months.


This forth and final shout concerns his published story SHOULDER – and if you click anywhere around here you can go read it – for free at The Cordland Review.


And, I’m requested to urge, if ya like that one, there’s more where it came from. Print and ebooks availability right here.


After I have passed on those essential points, I have been asked to end this and give thanks for reading this and get out.


Consider this done.

Another story (“Not Mama”) from INTIMATE DIALOGUES

August 28th, 2013

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Hi there.


Again.


My book of stories came out at the beginning of this summer. And it appears to be called Intimate Dialogues and you can click here to hear, buy and get more info about it.


If instead you care to read a story called NOT MAMA from this collection that was previously published online by FICTION365, you may CLICK RIGHT HERE.


Meanwhile, summer’s been good, and this here is a little reminder of things rolling on, and if getting involved in my fiction slipped your mind back in June, here it is in August, ready to slip back in.



Thanks for dropping by, even with a little benign force was employed. – Vincent

“Ledge” – another story from my collection, Intimate Dialogues

June 18th, 2013

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Recently my newest fiction work, a collection of stories, Intimate Dialogues, was published.


Some of the stories included in the collection were published elsewhere. One such story, Ledge, was published by the extremely well-regarded online literary magazine, The Barcelona Review. To read, click here to read LEDGE.


If you like it, and want to read similar stories, go here to buy the book.


And I made a video you may have not seen for this book’s promotion. Watch Here.


Thanks. – Vincent

INTIMATES DIALOGUES is now available.

June 4th, 2013

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Well, news has it my next book is out. And there’s a video attached.


The collection of stories, Intimate Dialogues, was written over the last decade or so. I did not bother to keep score of what was written when, and how, or why. It began, as these things do, with writing one, then another, and so on, until something Chekhov once said about his stories entered my mind, and this is not an accurate quote, but a muddy recollection:


“I write briefly about large subjects.”


I embraced this idea, it brought coherency to these stories that were suddenly appearing, and so wrote, when the appropriate story idea appeared before me, with this in mind: writing briefly about some subjects, characters and situations that could have been, perhaps, rather longer.


Additionally, it was pointed out to me early in my writing life by an editor, that I possessed a talent few writer’s had, and that was the ability to develop characters and situations using only dialogue. The stories were all (for the most part) created with dialogue being the main narrative style.


Needing to get the stories going quickly, unexpected intimacy between disparate characters experiencing critical moments in their lives became a theme.


Lastly, I chose to employ the word dialogue rather than the shorter American usage dialog. I fancied the look of the word dialogue. There were more letters. Maybe because the stories are so compressed, I wanted a slightly uncompressed title.


Here’s a video that’s supposed to seduce you into buying the book.


Click on this sentence to see the video.


Also, additionally, in a hyper-marketing sort of way, click on this sentence to read some story excerpts or find where to buy the book.


That’s my story on these stories. Some stories have been published elsewhere, and I’ll post those now and then so you can have an opportunity to read, to taste, see if you might want to buy all their brothers and sisters contained in this collection.


So long for now, Vincent

Intimate Dialogues – here’s a story from this forthcoming collection

May 14th, 2013

ID - FRONT_small_size_COVER My latest book, a collection of stories entitled INTIMATE DIALOGUES, is being released very shortly.


Several of the stories appearing in this collection have been previously published by online magazines. I’ll be posting some of them, so if you enjoy what you read, you might be tempted to order the whole collection (whether as printed book or ebook).


This one is the story that kickstarted the idea for the collection, which goes some years back (I’ll speak of this in the next blog posting).


Click here to read the story: Interruptions.


Interruptions first web page


More news on this book very soon. Thanks for dropping by, Vincent

The blurb business: “Intimate Dialogues” – new book of short stories

April 18th, 2013

ID - FRONT_small_size_COVERI mentioned recently my next book to see the light of life is Intimate Dialogues. Here’s the blurb I’m using to explain what readers can expect (a unavoidable commercial necessity).


Intimate Dialogues
Stories of people in confidential conversations. Dialogues between couples, whether two males, two females, male/female, old/young, couples, strangers, people and TVs or two dogs. On love, loss, hope, impropriety, friendship, death, anger, joy. Some are humorous, some fierce, most emotionally resonant. The talks occur in bars, in living rooms, in hospital waiting rooms, on building ledges, dentist chairs, therapists’ rooms, rest homes, usually face to face, rarely on phones. Always intimate.

Cover of my next book.

March 19th, 2013

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A collection of stories.